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education? >> when the state goes through a budget crisis, schools are going to be in the cross hairs. >> with two competing tax measures on the november ballot, what's at stake for the state and its budget strapped schools? coming up next. >>> hello. i'm al letson, in for belva davis. welcome to a special edition of "this week in northern california." with the november election just around the corner, the campaigns are heating up for propositions 30 and 38. tonight, we want to cut through the noise and try to make sense of what really is at stake for schools if one or both or neither get the green light. we'll hear from both sides in just a few minutes. plus, get some in depth analysis from two veteran education reporters. but first, we wanted to see just how bad the budget situation is in our schools. and how it got that way in the first place. pbs news hour correspondent spencer michaels takes a look. >> in schools around the state, there's a feeling that the ax is about to fall. and if and when it does, san francisco school superintendent will have to act. >> we have our doomsday
of the economic downturn, the education in our country have had their budgets dropped. it makes it challenging, most would say come to believe that our students in the future will be competing on a level playing field on around the world because of bigger class sizes, fewer books, less time with quality teachers. how would you improve education? mr. smith, you would suggest eliminating the department of indication altogether. is that the right plan for this moment? -- the department of education altogether. >> the best way to educate our students is at the state level. that is between the local school board, teachers, and parents. i said i would take a look at the department of education, and it's possible, but they do some good things. we do not want to throw it away, but we need -- any federal organization, especially as big as the department of education, there's a lot of waste in there. give that money to the states. they can do it themselves. that's a state issue. it would be more economical doing it that way. we need to eliminate a lot of mandates from the department of education. i don'
that all citizens understand that if we are going to have a world class education system we have to balance that against other things. we cannot both have a big bullet train to nowhere that is going to cost probably over $billion dollars and have a world class system. i hope for the american dream to continue here in california and i hope to have the opportunity one day represent the voters of san francisco and play my role in the public service and i come mend the senator for doing that and sacrificing his career in that regard and i hope to be able to join him one day, thank you. >> i inseerly thank the an dates, on behalf of the league of san francisco, and the jr. league of san francisco. the university of california san francisco, the san francisco public librariry and our media partner, san francisco government television. and thanks to each of you, for taking the time to inform yourself about your choices on november 6th. good evening. [ applause ] >> jennifer wagner. jnny first joined the league in san francisco in 2001 and has since volunteered in many roles at the local, regional
proceedings it is about transparently in government and education we. have over 70 law schools and students who have unlimited access to this level. and so in large part, what we are trying to do, or what i have done, is tried to restore faith here in our government institutions by seeing how our court system works. your court system is not perfect, but when people see how our jury system actually works and learn about that, it is one step closer to again, reengaging a citizen in government. and we have to use technology, it is one of those credible tools that while people are disenfranchised in what is going on in sacramento with the lack of transparency, we can have a much more service-oriented government that reengages people. >> so speaking of service orientation, what do you think that the government should do? and where should the government step aside? >> in terms of... >> what do you think is the role of government? it is a very general question. >> so, the role of government is to provide basic services that the private sector would just not provide. i mean, education, i mean, it i
and midsize businesses for granted the last thing i want to do is completely reform our education system from pre-k, k-12, high school, and universities so when kids get out of school they have a basic reading and math skills necessary. we want them to have the basic skills to get a job because right now there is a major disconnect even though we are the fifth highest unemployment rate. have employers that cannot find qualified employees right here in north carolina. that is unacceptable. >> all four of those proposals are large-scale proposals that would take some time to implement. is there something you can do in your first month as governor? >> everything i would implement we have to start thinking long- term. one thing i learned as mayor is that short-term remedies usually don't have long-term solutions. i am talking about big plans because we are in the pits right now regarding our economy as a leader, you need to look at solutions that are not just something that will correct the problem in a month or two and you are right back with the same problem. long-term solutions are needed for
is recognize that we need to cut, cut, cut. and reenvig rate what our priorities are. the example is education verses the bullet train, i don't think that we can have both right now. >> thank you. >> mr. leno? >> yes. what i have learned through ten years of working in the state legislature, is we have a very serious and significant governor nans problem and that is two-thirds vote requirement on the most important issue of the day which is revenue. we have seen our revenue cut significantly by taxes that arnold schwarzenegger cut his first day in office. we have a depoll that prop is trying to refill it. we should not have to do it at the ballot box when out of 40 state senators 14 have more power than 26. 14 can veto when 26 want. i tell fifth graders that and they say that is not democracy that is not possible. that is exactly the problem, we don't have democracy on all issues, revenue-related in the legislature, let the majority party do its job and if the voters don't like what the majority party is doing in no one jerry man dered districts change who is in power, it is call democracy. >>
figure that miss dillan used is not in educational out comes it is in per pupil. we rank 47th. >> as a result we rank 50 as the number of counselors and the number of nurses in our schools and the number of libranias in. you get what you pay for. >> our state has been starved for cash for the past ten years as a result of tax cuts the state could not afford that the prior governor put on the credit cards. we need to provide significantly more funding not only through k-12 education which is the birth right of every child to be able to get a quality public education in my opinion and to be able to pursue the dream of a higher education and that is getting further and further out of the reach of children in california because the state does not support education. we need funding, we need to spend it on education. >> so, therefore, do you think that community colleges should perhaps change their focus? one idea is to focus on retraining unemployed workers and upgrading skills for new jobs. do you feel that the state should encourage this? and how? >> if you are making reference t
proposition 30 ... which would raise some taxes to fund education. update news tim vantress is looking into the controversy and has a live report ... tim. it's election season, and professors have to be careful when speaking about issues on the ballot. the state university system is already on notice. ">>>students are seen on campus promoting election campaigns virtually every day. herlinda aguirre, president, students for quality education: "we have a possibility, we have a viable opportunity to make a stop to this cut for this year." sometimes, even teachers join them . . . . . . but not while they are on the job. c-s-u monterey bay is being sued for this very reason. the howard jarvis taxpayers association claims a teacher sent an e-mail advocating proposition 30 with a university-given address. larry carr: (associate vp of public affairs): "as state employees, we are not allowed to use state resources for political purposes." associate vice president of public affairs larry carr says when elections roll around, teachers have to be extra careful. even using state-owned equipment to
a little bit about that. >> yes, we intend to conduct customer notification and education program. components that we talked about previously were very targeted toward the statutorily required opt out. now we're factoring in a preenrollment phase ahead of that opt out. that's the approach we think we're going to be recommending and how to ensure that communication and education that goes with that plan is as responsive and as complete and deep as it needs to be to make sure that we don't have any accidental customers. >> commissioner pimentel. >> what type of outreach strategies do you have to educate the community members about cleanpower sf and how will you go about implement them? will there be community meetings or mailers? >> it's a all of the above approach at this point. as i said we just got our customer education and notification consultant on board -- authority really -- not even on board yet, authority to get them on board, so it's of course developing, but yes we see working with community based organizations, using community meetings. i would say that prior to our
adapted easily but at this period, education and credentials. economy is fast-changing and who knows what it will throw at us? women are getting those killed and credentials that a faster rate than men are and seem to be more nimble and that filters into our society. in the book i talk about how that changes marriage and notions of fatherhood and what men can or cannot do in families or how young people have sex and make decisions and you start to see it having an influence in our culture basically. >> host: we have heard there's a crisis with girls, they learn their not strong in math and science and bears emphasis on trying to prove that and it will come as a shock that women far outstripped men in academic performance. >> guest: i have a daughter and two sons. it you occasion is the clearest argument. girls do better than boys and now they have equal as 80 scores in math and do better in verbal scores. it starts early in life and that is largely a development question. we demand a lot more of younger and younger children and girls develop faster than boys. that is where it starts and p
aggravated by these preferences. that means "mismatch" affects higher education. >> another two or three minutes. >> one thing we talk about is another sign of racial preference, prominent in the discussion which is the diversity interest of schools. one of the things research has shown that we talk about in the book is how much the diversity affects, moderated by the academic distance, when you admit students with large preferences they are less likely to socially interact with peers of other raises. this is very well documented by research. there is also self doubt affects of low grades. one study found students who believe they were admitted on preference are more vulnerable to serious arms threat. diversity research when looked at carefully fits nicely into c-span2 -- "mismatch" findings, talking about these various effects, then we go into problems of institutional behavior and that is a large part of the problem. wanting to demonstrate these effects but it is another to get institutions of higher education to deal with that. when you only look of the lineup to see how uniform is th
't real where my passion was. so i went back to school, got my masters in education and never turned back. everything i've done has been related to education, even in the classroom or running a nonprofit organization. i've been in executive management leadership for over 30 years now. first as executive director of a start-up of nonprofit. that became eventually a $10 million organization. and eventually i ran for school board and i have been on the school board for 8 years and currently i'm the president. during the eight years i've been able to provide leadership, build consensus and make tough decisions. and because of that now we have the best urban school district in california. our test scores have gone up every single year since i've been on the school board. and, in fact, last year was the first time we started closing the achievement gap, which is not the easiest thing to do for any school district. i can't tell you this right now because it's in bargain, but we know our test scores as a district and we're going to be showing when it comes out in a week or so that it's going to b
the distractions, and listen and learn and read and question more about who is really benefiting and educating ourselves on how we got here and figure out how each of us can make a positive impact, that's the way to change the system. knowledge sharing, truth-seeking, open debate, fresh ideas, and discovering a common ground among each other. no matter what your political persuasion, we are the critical time in our nation's history. it's time to take our country back from the private interests who control our beliefs, our opinions and our lives. [cheers and applause] thank you very much for joining us tonight. our moderator this evening is award-winning broadcaster and media personality larry king. [cheers and applause] >> don't, don't. >> his new online home is aura tv and he is the host of "larry king now." welcome larry. [cheers and applause] >> thank you. and welcome everybody. i'm very happy to be doing this. i think all voices should be heard. a few notes about the format for tonight's debate, really easy job for me because it's a rather simple format. each candidate will have an opportu
they share bathrooms. well enough. it is a prive privilege to get an education and you can't just abuse it. and so the fact they build new dorms and a lot of that is rushish. put it in the classroom and teachers and students where it will have an affect in the end and so that you see it in grades. >> sally do you support the fact that you keep giving. >> were not. federal money goes to research grants and stuff like that. not for operating costings. but the states are what fund state universities have cut their spendog state universities 15 percent and enrollment went up 12 percent . meanwhile public universities are $5000 cheeper than private. this is a mountain out of a hole hill. >> wayne, that is happening out in california. >> it is happening everywhere. i say i think sally is right in that sense. you have to put the money where it is going to serve the people and the educational purpose. it will sench them in university and the government gets out of the business of being a principal or deanr schoolmarm. governmentopoly and regulation and increase prices. and the reason the iphone we
education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but definitely, we need to create community anchored solu
sector establishing and maintaining a eight-year partnership with the san francisco giants to educate, and to prevent pertussis from killing children in san francisco. i have a master's degree in economics and i am a music performer and so i am creative. i believe that the supervisor needs to be creative and think outside of the box to solve the issues that face district five in our city. i will work to make san francisco truly a transit city. a developed country is not one where poor people have cars, it is where rich people take public transportation. muni needs to be a viable, efficient, safe and clean transit option for everybody in san francisco. i want to work to make that happen as supervisor. i also will do the simple things like fix the road and the sidewalks that are in disrepair in district five which limit the mobility of seniors and the disabled. as supervisor i will support small businesses. i will talk to small business people in district five, they say that are feeling squeezed by skyrocketing grants and red tape and competition for big box stores. i will represent at
to thank the board of supervisors and board of education for holding this meeting. it's important for high school students and it's important for youth to graduate from high school with resources and for qualifications for going to usc or ucs. also recognizing there are many youth out there who don't know where or how to find their way to resources even if they wanted to. and with this new a-g requirement, students are able to graduate with a guarantee that they will qualify for csus and ucs, but it's very alarming to see there are so many disputes who are off-track on graduating. and i would want my peers to have the support that they need. so if there were more resources, like how these resources were able to help me. we need to make sure that all students have the opportunity, resources and support that they need to graduate. and 2014 may seem far away, but it's these next two years and the support we may or may not get that will determine where our future will be. thank you for your time. >> thank you very much and we want to thank the members of youth commissioner for their tremendo
of that assessment an educational process of how do we ride bicycles here in san francisco? because it's kind of confusing. >> thank you. >> the next question is for miss breed, mr. davis and miss johnson. a recent civil grand jury report called the san francisco ethics commission essentially a sleeping watchdog. at the request of supervisor campos the city requested a comparison of ethics in san îg:]Ñand los angele identifying ways our ethic laws could be strengthened. as supervisors, what if anything would you propose to strength the city's ethics laws. i will start with mr. davis. >> strong ethic laws are essential. what is happening with our sunshine task force and hope davis can speak to this since she recently served on the task force. these need to be strengthened and one problem we have is around enforcement. i would like to see more of the ethical violations of larger committees, some of which are operating, for instance, in some shady areas of law. one was the run he ed run, the committee for mayor ed lee last year and the campaigns that aren't swaying the politics of city,
, and herman cain with the mission to educate the public on issues facing us today. john: that government doesn't always make life better? >> that government has to get out of the way, or this economy and this country's going down the tubes. john: the chicken ad, you know, people say it's ridiculous, this is low budget. it's silly. it's beneath the importance of politics, and, yet, on super tuesday -- >> one of the most viewed youtube videos out there, just like the smoking ad. john: got more hits than all the other guys running their commercials. >> combined, yes. john: the girl who says "any questions" is the director's daughter. >> yes. john: this director works for other people in addition to the smoking man ad. one is a cgressional candidate running in california against nancy pelosi -- good luck to him -- immediate -- med ya was not giving him attention. >> strangling job creation, burying us under a mountain of debt. >> do you want 500 americans to lose their jobs? are you serious? >> i am. john dennis, and i approve this message. john: he's the candidate, but, really, zombies. argue the
measures that would raise money for education and money in education is in dire straits. it's okay to vote for both. i also do support gross receipts. and i'm a small business person, and i wanted to let you all know that i have done sort of looked what i pay now $9,000. i have seven employees and i pay $9,000 a year and i will pay $750. so for small businesses the gross receipts actually does help and does not put the burden on the little guy and it is progressive and so it does become progressively as you make more money. many one concern with small businesses there are businesses out there that have a lot of gross receipts, but they have no profit. and this is something that the only thing that concerns about those two things. finally i would be okay with reinstating the vehicle license fee at the levels it was before. >> thank you. candidate john rizzo, who could not join us tonight said in response to the survey that his "top policy objective was better management of the city." if the city's growing liabilities outpace revenue, what poorly managed programs could be reformed or elimin
in the association and portero hill and dog patch and educated to make the neighborhood a thriving place and located on alameda and if you haven't been there you must go. take my word for it. it's a beautiful space and menu. they utilized local designers and recycled and refurbished to create their modern -- when i say modern it really is and modern and welcome being atmosphere. a special feature is their wonderful patio and garden style with heat lamps and the nights are chilly they have warm kompy blankets for you. they thought of everything. they continue the community commitment and look for sustainable greends and locally produced and glutton free and some deep fried japanese mushrooms. i haven't had that one. but i had the squid seafood spaghetti and it's divine and another favorite is the lavender pan cota for desert. on the review for school there was a couple that summed it up like this. "it was simply divine" and please put your hands together and welcome olia. >> thank you so much supervisor. really kind words. i am honored. i am humbled. i am happy to receive the award among th
coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go out shopping, take the materials that, and get to work. it is kind of like a reprieve, so they can really focus on their body of work. >> when you are talking about recology, do you have the only sculpture garden at the top? >> it is based on wo
predict health, education outcomes of children based on the zip code, where they live is really a tragedy and it's not something that we as americans want to see as an outcome for the next generations and part of the obama's in fact and i have builds on this and the revitalization program and with choice neighborhoods including the planning grants we're announcing here in san francisco we intend to replicate that success across the count ree. as you know today every federal dollar is precious and with choice neighborhoods we have been able to leverage that with other capital and we have grants and including $30 million that was awarded just a little bit ago for the housing development in the bay view, but those $125 million have leveraged additional 1.$6 billion in other funding and that is a ratio or return of 13 to one which is extraordinary as well, so a couple of things , the neighborhood and build the sustainable community of approximately 1600 mixed income units and in the sunny dale neighborhood the corporation will use the grant to have a transformation grant for the neighborhood
. uninterrupted. and on digital 4.2. is just one of two related to education that is going to be on the ballot. dan kerman has the details of these two initiatives. about four or students, the california future. vote " yes ". , proposition 38 will bring a lot of money to or schools. >> proposition 385 billion of dollars on the education st. >> if you listen to this it is to listen there are conflicting in similar assertions creating confusion. >> there is more many in education. the patrick murphy says that there are distinct differences. proposition 30 is backed by the governor in teachers' union calls for one quarter sales tax for four years. and it will raise the income tax for people earning $250,000 per year or more for seven years. this is the brainchild and backed by the pta would raise the income tax on most people in california for 12 years. it is one distinct difference. but the top one percent would pay for 78% of the revenue. the top one percent would pay for 44 percent of the revenue. >> there is also a difference on where the money goes. at least this year it would go into the ge
that judgment and now you have to work with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain differen
training, provide an education that prepares students for 4 year universities, keep city college libraries and student support services open, keep technology and instructional support up to date, and offset state budget cuts. i'm here with alyssa messer, an english teacher at city college of san francisco. she's the ppt of aft2121, the faculty union, and a proponent of proposition a. also joining us is starchild, a local activist with the libertarian party of san francisco and a former candidate for the san francisco school board. he's an opponent of the measure. thank you both for taking the time to be with us today. >> thank you. >> alyssa, i'd like to give you the opportunity it share the thoughts of your position. >> so proposition a is a temporary 8-year, $79 parcel tax on properties in san francisco. and that money would go directly to supporting city college of san francisco. city college is the largest work force training center in san francisco. we train students. we also help students learn english as a second language and then of course one of our primary missions is to help
for the next four years: making education and training a national priority; building on our manufacturing boom; boosting american-made energy; reducing the deficits responsibly by cutting where... we can, and asking the wealthy to pay a little more. and ending the war in afghanistan, so we can... do some nation-building here at home. that's the right path. so read my plan, compare it to governor romney's... and decide which is better for you. it's an honor to be your president... and i'm asking for your vote... so together, we can keep moving america forward. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >>> tracking sandy this moing. we have live pictures from rehoboth beach, already feeling the effects of this monster storm. the category 1 hurricane has its sights set on the east coast and coastal communities like rehoboth beach and many through north carolina and new jersey are bracing for impact to see where this storm might make landfall. our area may not get a direct hit from sandy but we could still feel the effects. >> many cities and counties are putting resources in place. joining us
closer and people realize we need to stop the cuts to education. >> reporter: i spoke with the chairman with the california gop. he said it will cost jobs and will fail and that prop 32 will bring stability. he said the republican party spent a big amount of full-time and money to get the word out. in fact the activist just donated another $13 million making the total contributions $36.5 million. now the goal of this statewide day of action is to contact 300,000 registered voters and so far in here one of these volunteers has called more than 800 people alone. in oakland, alyssa, hairington, cbs 5. >>> several are declaring states of emergency as a fearsome superstorm threatens the eastern seaboard. hurricane sandy is building strength over the atlantic ocean. the fear is as it moves closer inland sandy will run into two winter weather systems. creating one huge storm called frankenstorm. and for the very latest on say. let's check in with roberta gonzales in the weather center. >> 630 million people will be i want pacted -- impacted by hurricane sandy. which right now take a look at th
believe is clear to anybody with an 8th grade education or above in san francisco that is watching this drama on tv. now the reality of this act... >> given what else is going on today, i doubt that you have much of an audience. >> and we don't, thanks to god that sfgov, tv does do instant replays, thanks for taking some of my time. >> i did want to discuss the concept of due process and i did want to discuss the idea that the constitutional provisions for due process apply. and it is completely appropriate, in fact, it is the ethical thing to do for this ethics commission to send this case over to berkeley's ethics commission because at least they are hearing cases and they don't have bias, built in. it is unfair for city members of the sunshine task force to have on-going conversations with the director of the ethics commission when mr. pilpal is doing that in these rooms, this type of conflict of interest that is built into the con lusion, between the different city agencies is off the hook. since 1999, willie brown issued orders to every one of his documents and commissions not
of opportunity funds. he has combined his background as a community organizer with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading provider of micro loans in california, and has a robust community real estate finance unit. next, we have the ceo of ne community federal credit union. since 1988, she has been the ceo of northwest community federal credit union. under her watch, the credit union group to over 1600 members. it has become the national model for institutions seeking to provide financial education and banking services to the low- income communities. last but not least, we have our conditional lender represented here by wells fargo. mark cyrus is the senior fda banker for the region -- the senior sba banker. he held businesses choose the best loans for the growing business and focus on a comprehensive understanding of their goals for their business. mark is responsible for helping entrepreneurs with sba loans
to write business plans. also helping to educate the distinction between the micro lender, our bank, and our larger financial institutions and how those lending -- what is the difference in how this entities will lend, in addition to the sba loans that are available. also in response to the economic crisis, which hit a couple of months after we open our doors, the mayor reinstated the revolving loan fund, and we partnered with tmc working solutions, which is a micro lender, to provide a loan fund for start of an existing businesses to help them. today, that loan has given out 23 loans, and they are averaging around $15,000 or $25,000 each. another unique thing that the city is doing in terms of helping our businesses and dealing with capital needs is as a city, sometimes, we implement regulations, and you would think that might require some substantial capital for small businesses to do an understanding that a lot of our very small businesses may not have the capital means to be able to implement those regulations. a new one that has just been implemented is there is the fats, oils,
predicting it would be jam san francisco instead of san francisco you knew that folks were educated because of the great leadership at our mta, our county transportation, all of our transit systems and were at the highest level of educating the visitors and others to use public transportation. it will work for all of us and as we build the housing units we identified in hunter's point and treasure island and welcome more people to our great city and we are growing as a result. we are going to have the greatest subway system that can connect to our bart, to our caltrans, to up and down our muni lines. this central subway will be a great success. it will connect to some of the most densely populated and rapidly developing areas, and it will improve access to all of our vibrant communities, and really is investments like this that will foster loyalty among all of our public transit customers while we reduce carbon emissions, make our city cleaner and cleaner. i'm not the only one that thinks this way. you know i'm among many, many friends today in the audience, on stage and i would like to
education and get employment and they can become a productive member of society. and generally the juveniles, again, that we deal with are not any different than the adults we deal with. these are juveniles that often come from homes where supervision of the home is either not there or is very lacking. there's really a significant lack of role model support so there are a lot of problems already. the juveniles that generally come to our attention already bring with themselves. the problem is there's still not enough funding, there is not enough vehicles to provide the services that are necessary, so that is a challenge for us, and unfortunately, often the drug use, drug abuse and those other things do lead to serious crimes when they in fact do become involved in a different part of the process. the other question has to do with back and track. i don't see 1506 impacting negatively on back on track. in fact, the conversations in our office are today around how do we expand the program and back on track is a successful program and we've used a very small population. for those of you who are n
are in the education program for science or technology and how are we creating jobs in this country and infrastructure and anything like that. so most importantly, how are we fostering innovation in this country, that america, uniquely is founded on the grounds of innovation, we are here in the city where so much that have has happened in so many profound ways. and it seems like every time that we have such disruption in this country. and this time... the financial down turn and the pressure of cyber security and the pressures of so many other things, you know, in... how are we driving innovation forward to champion out of that like we have done over and over and over in the history of this country. in the government, plays a fascinating role in that. i will give you an example of a place that we are doing that, that gets the president excited. and that is when you are thinking differently about the digital assets and in last may... in new york and throughout the very non-governmental place to give a speech, got on stage and talked about fostering this of the 21st century government and the digital go
academy to take care of her grieving mother father during months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond, georgia and surrounding areas welcomed matthew home with tears, flags and salutes. the streets are lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service as a method in church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout and a local boy scout by collecting pens and paper and sent them to matthew's unit in afghanistan. a dear friend, jim bunn who is involved in media had a vision and the matthew freeman project again. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film that launched the project on memorial day 2010. since then, with the help of so many volunteers, he can't name them all, the project has spent over seven tons of school supplies to soldiers are buried for humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthew small town of richmond hill, now a city of savanna and our great army bases at fort stewart and hunter army airfield in savanna air guard to help me heal by supporting the matthew
program, clear-cut ways to improve education. >> joe, i remember a couple of years ago -- >> i do it every year. >> but a series of wonderful articles, before the midterm for "time" magazine. you talked over a lot of the midwest, middle class. and you found that the -- china came up ten times as often as afghanistan -- >> 20. >> 20 types as often as afghanistan. when you look at the -- what an average middle-class american family is facing, particularly kind of people who work in factories, they're up against probably a generation of this kind of wage competition and -- possibly wage deflation because of china, things. do you -- what do you think happens to the politics of america if that middle class is not appreciably better five, six, eight years from now? >> well, we're heading toward, i think, a demographic period of real difficulty as the white majority declines. and there's -- and there's a fear of -- out in the middle of the country of this new america that's emerging that is so multicultural, multiethnic. but i do think -- once again, i'm going to be slightly optimistic here becau
a devastating effect on education in california. >> if prop 30 fails, school and colleges would face $6 billion in cuts. the trigger cuts as governor brown is calling them. small business action committee is pushing hard to defeat the msh measure saying higher taxes will drive away jobs. >> for more, we sat down with governor jerry brown at kcbs myself and our first question is, okay, look, this isn't the first time that voters in california have been asked to bail out the state budget. why isn't it fixed and why should they go for this? >> the last ten yards to go over the goal line is this money for schools. it's an either/or. on or off. either money in to schools or money out of schools. i wish it didn't have to be this way. but at the end of the day i hope people know that 99% of the people will not pay this income tax. it's only 1% and what people will pay is a penny when they get a $400 cappucino or a sandwich. a penny. if you buy $8 purchase, it's two pennies. our schools are at risk. we have been cutting classes. we are raising tuition. we have been shortening the school year. i'm telli
, toll bridges. >> reporter: public school education by law is guaranteed 48% of the state's general fund, whereas corrections gets about 7%. on average, the state and federal government allocate almost 9,000 per pupil in california, less than half of what the state of new york spends on its students. but getting more money for schools often means asking local voters to increase their own taxes. for example, the city of berkeley raises more than $3,000 per pupil in extra funds. other school districts have had similar success in the bay area, schools in poorer districts, though, don't have parents who can afford that. >> affluent communities are counting on taxes. affluent communities are passing local bonds to improve the quality of their school facilities. but these are not options available to a lot of middle class and blue collar communities. >> reporter: where budgets are tight and dollars are short, consider this. nearly 50% of inmates nationwide are high school dropouts. in san francisco, dana king, cbs 5. >>> last year, the state cut funding for prisons by more than $4 billion. the
vote idea. here is a way of spending -- let's get rid of elections and get rid of having educated citizens who are educated every two and four years. wouldn't it be easier if we had no money in politics, no elections, no vote counting. >> wait a second. the point here is actually -- i know -- i'm saying if we are worried about the expensive campaigns, i think running the popular vote election is more expensive. >> we have to do more than reforms as well. it's why the people who are push thg are saying yes, we need money out and people in. we need a full democracy. it's one part of it. i don't think it's sufficient. >> how is making every vote count going to cause more money to be raised? >> hold that thought. you can think about this. you can't think about the way it will impact the policy positions the candidates take. i think that might be interesting. we'll be back with more after this. that can only come from having someone else pay your mortgage for an entire year... this is what you'll experience if you win the quicken loans skip-a-year mortgage sweepstakes. up to five winne
grateful that president obama and my husband are making quality investments to move us forward on education. [applause] i am also involved in this election as a woman who cares about the direction of this country. i see barack and joe stand up for our freedoms every single day. the very first bill president obama signed was the ledbetter fair pay act. [applause] the president and vice-president know how important it is for women to make our own decisions about our own bodies and our own health care. [applause] so many women of my generation have fought hard for roe versus wade and for equal rights. we do not want our daughters and our granddaughters to have to go back and fight those same battles that we fought decades ago, and we cannot forget about the importance of the supreme court and the direction this country could take. [applause] finally, i care about this country, as this -- about this election as a military mom. our sons served in iraq for a year. i have had the honor of meeting many of our military families. i see how much they love this country and the sacrifice they have made
provided by the department of education have be sent to all 26 public housing developments in zone a, they're available to take the 45,000 residents in these areas to designated shelters, flyers have been posted in one of these developments and staff is knocking on doors to alert residence about the mandatory evacuations. the nypd is making voumts in those developments and throughout zone a and loud speakers in some of the squad cars. residents can also call 311 to find out where to get busses and to get help with those evacuations. 7:00 p.m., all elevators in those 26 developments will be shut off. heat and hot water will also be shut off. so if you live in one of those developments it's imperative that that you get to a safe location out of zone a before that time. all school based after school programs are closed tomorrow as well. as are most other after school programs. let me give you some other updates on city operations. the department of homeless services has enhanced street outreach to encourage people on the street to seek shelter. street outreach will continue during the -- city
, and purpose. i took that sense of purpose, and i studied journalism at the edward r. mural school of education because it gave me an opportunity to engage in the issues shaping my community. i took that sense of purpose, and i worked at the office of united states senator cantwell, i worked on her immigration services staff but more importantly i worked on her staff advocating for those democratic values, those values of truth, honesty, inclusion and tolerance. i took that sense of purpose and i went to school at hastings college of law. there i served as vice president of one of the largest law schools, largest public law schools in the country. i took that sense of purpose, and i applied to the san francisco courts indegint panel and there i work on behalf excuse the expression, dirt poor residents who cannot afford an attorney of their own. but i did not stop there. i took that sense of purpose, and i founded the radio and television program that originate, on ksfs called folk law to give voice to the issues facing san francisco now these are not the issues that make the 10:00 o'clock news,
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